I know more about ADD/ADHD than my psychiatrist

It’s annoyingly official… I know more about treating ADD/ADHD than my new psychiatrist (1st year psychiatry resident). I asked her today about medications & pregnancy and she said that she’d have to get back to me about it… and amazingly, this is a specialty ADD/ADHD clinic in my local university hospital.

In the same conversation, she also tried to order me to take my SSRI for PMDD continuously instead of in two week cycles. Actually, she’d never heard about people taking SSRIs in two-week cycles for the treatment of PMDD.

I’ll call her in a week to talk about ADD meds & pregnancy. I had to promise to not get pregnant in the  next week until she’s had a chance to do her research.

I respect that there’s a learning curve and that new doctors need to be given allowances to learn how to practice medicine… but I don’t have time for this, and think I need to find a new doctor.

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2 responses to “I know more about ADD/ADHD than my psychiatrist

  1. Would you have preferred for the resident to attempt to cover her ignorance and simply take her ‘best educated guess’?

    A physician at any level may not have confident answers on the tip of their tongue, especially if their patient has a keen grasp of pharmacology and medicine.

    Stating that you know more about something than a doctor may or may not be true. Your ‘knowledge’ may have been garnered from secondary sources or your educational background may be insufficient to properly digest the primary pharmacodynamics proposed by the manufacturing company. Your doctor is not a CPS or PDR, if they were, those compendiums wouldn’t exist.

    If you were particularly impatient, which you claim to be, then perhaps stating your acceptance of her consultation of her reference books in your presence would have saved you both time, as its likely that she didn’t feel dragging out the books in front of you would inspire much confidence, which you could have offered to alleviate.

    You claim to know more about treating ADD/ADHD than your 1st year psychiatry resident-attending physician which is unlikely unless your a physician yourself and in the case of Adderall…at least a pharmacologist.

    But since you don’t have time to permit your physician to ensure the validity of her counsel, then perhaps you ought to consult with a pharmacist about the possible effects of your drug regime on pregnancy…and perhaps they would be familiar with your atypical SSRI rotation.

    The possibility that you havn’t done this already on your own suggests that such comments in regard to having a superior clinical knowledge of your diagnosis may not be advisable on your part, especially towards a medical professional.

  2. @PreMedAA
    > Stating that you know more about something
    > than a doctor …

    You seem to have forgotten that the original poster *is* “a doctor”. Further, the fact the she has a PhD indicates she is a real doctor, as opposed to the mere technician that many MDs are.

    “Doctor” was originally meant to designate someone who by virtue of contributing new knowledge to a field is capable of not only working in the field but also of the higher task of *teaching* in that field. This is why a key component of the PhD is novelty in the dissertation.

    Medical “doctors” by contrast — at least by virtue of their degrees — really merit only the title of “master” — i.e. one with a license to *practice* and not teach; a simple worker in the field. It’s an important job, but let’s not get carried away with any kind of worship. Let’s face it; if it wasn’t for the fact that governments control (with violence and threats thereof) who may and may not authorize the use, possession and sale of certain substances, the whole aura of godliness of many medical “doctors” would soon pale.

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